How to Replace the Fuel Pump

Last Updated - April 4, 2005


This how to was created when Ed replaced the fuel pump on his Voyager.  The fuel pump on the minivans is in the top of the tank whereas the pumps on the cars are in the rear of the tank.  Although all applications are not identical, they should still be very close.

Difficulty:  

Time Investment:  3 - 4 Hours
                              
 

Go to Pictures:

Go to Instructions:

Go to Tools Required:
 

Go to Supplies to Remember:


Pictures:

Click on a picture to enlarge it.

First up, manditory safety equipment for working around a large amount of gasoline, an ABC fire extinguisher. These are the screws that hold the fuel filler tube to the the body. Here is what an damaged stap bolt looks like. On the threads you can see part of the extruded U-nut.. The bolt will have to be cut off and a new bolt and extruded U-nut will be needed. I used a 3/8" bolt and U-nut. The fuel tank is unbolted and lowered with a floor jack.
Here's a shot of the fuel lines connecting to the pump.
Here's a shot of the vent tube. This is the electrical connector to the pump. A screw driver may be needed to pry up on the locking tab (or the connector may be secured some other way.) 
A brass drift is need to turn the locking ring counter clockwise. Do no use steel. Steel can spark.
Here is the lock ring ready for removal. The claw of a hammer is used to gently pry up on pump. The pump being pulled from the tank Here is a complete shot of the old fuel pump. 
Here is the new fuel pump A new sealing gasket is installed on the new pump The old locking ring is used to secure the new pump.
Here's a shot of the pump locked into place.
This pump came with a new sub harness. On the new sub-harness, the connector is a new style "zero insertion force" type connector. There is a slider that locks the electrical connector in place. These are fuel injection hose clamps.  You will need one 5/16" and one 1/4". The old vent tube needs to be installed on the new pump. First the inner plastic pieces goes on/


Then the outer tube gets pushed over it. Ed destroyed the old strap mounting hardware during the removal process and purchased some SAE extruded U-nuts and bolts from the local hardware store for a replacement.




Instructions:

1.  Jack up the rear end of the vehicle and place it on jack stands to make the fuel tank accessible.

2.  Remove the screws that hold the fuel filler tube to the the body.

3.  Unbolt and lower the tank with a floor jack.

4.  Remove fuel lines.
Once the old clamp is unbolted, the easiest way to remove the fuel lines is to grab them with a pair of channel locks, twist and pull.  That does a good job of breaking them free.

5.  Disconnect the electrical connector
A screw driver may be needed to pry up on the locking tab (or the connector may be secured some other way.)

6.  Clean any debris off the top of the tank.
Ed used his shop vac to vacuum off the top of the fuel pump.  There was a lot stone dust up there.


7.  Remove the locking ring with a brass drift.
A brass drift is need to turn the locking ring counter clockwise.   Do no use steel.  Steel can spark.

8.  Pry the pump out.
Ed used the claw of a hammer to pull it free and then simply twisted & pulled it out of the tank.

9.  Remove the vent tube.
Squeeze the locking tabs and pull.

10.  Install the new sealing gasket on the new pump.

11.  Put the new pump in the tank and install the old locking ring. 
Again a brass drift must be used. 

Hint: Since Ed didn't drain the tank, the fuel pump wanted to float on the fuel making it difficult to seat the pump.  The tank was empty enough that it could be tilted to move the fuel away from the pump.  Then the pump seated properly.


12.  Install the new sub-harness if one came with the pump.
On this new sub-harness, the connector is a new style "zero insertion force" type connector.  There is a slider that locks the electrical connector in place.

13.  Attach the fuel lines with new hose clamps.
Fuel injection hose clamps are recommended over the more common worm drive hose clamps.   Even if you didn't destroy the old ones, they are considered "one time use", so it is best to replace them.  You will need one 5/16" and one 1/4".

14.  Hook up the vent tube.
First the inner plastic pieces goes on.  Then the outer tube gets pushed over it.

15.  Replace mounting hardware.
If you are like Ed, you will destroy the old strap mounting (badly rusted) hardware.  Ed purchased some SAE extruded U-nuts and bolts from the local hardware store..

Tools Required:     

Supplies to Remember: